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Creating a Data Backup Plan

In the digital world we live in, the only copy of our irreplaceable photos or important business data sits on a mechanical hard drive that can fail at any point without warning. Yikes!

Data loss can be devastating personally and professionally, and although data recovery is sometimes possible, the process is expensive and can’t always recover all of your files.

Creating a data backup plan can save you time and money if you have a hard drive crash. It may seem complicated, but it can be done fairly easily using the 3-2-1 backup strategy.

Cloud storage upload and download data management technology

The 3-2-1 Backup Strategy

The 3-2-1 backup strategy is made up of three rules, which are:

  • Three copies of your data- Copy 1 is your original data (your primary copy). You should then have at least two backup copies.
  • Two different storage types- Both backup copies should be kept on two separate storage types to minimize the chance of failure. Storage types could include a USB flash drive, internal hard drive, external hard drive, removable storage drive, DVD, tape or cloud backup.
  • One copy offsite- At least one backup copy should be located offsite, away from your primary copy. This protects you from a natural disaster that could destroy all the local copies.

For example, let’s say your files are on the hard drive on your home computer. For your first backup copy, you can use an external hard drive, which you can easily access if you need to retrieve a file. You would then want to set up a cloud backup as your second (archive) backup copy.

If your computer hard drive fails, you can get your files back from either of your two backups. The external hard drive should be your first choice, because copying is much faster via USB cable than downloading from the cloud over your internet connection. But in the event your house catches on fire or you have a power surge that wipes out both the computer and the external drive, that cloud storage backup is going to be a lifesaver (and worth every penny).

If you’d like to have me set up a backup plan for you, contact me for data backup service.

Boot Device Not Found Error or Hard Drive Not Detected

This series of error messages- Boot Device Not Found,  Hard Drive not Detected, No Boot Device Found, No Bootable Device,, No Boot Partition Found, Hard Disk Drive Failure, Data error Reading Drive, Blank screen with flashing Cursor, Seek error – Sector not found, Missing Operating System, Operating System Not Found, Primary Hard Disk Failure, Error Loading Operating System, Drive not Ready- all these messages are really saying the same thing. The computer can’t find your operating system so it can’t boot into Windows.

The easiest thing to check is whether the hard drive, or the cable running to the hard drive may have come loose from the motherboard. Connecting the drive or cable snugly to the motherboard will quickly resolve the problem.

The hard drive on the left has a loose cable, the one on the right shows the cable connected snugly.

Virus or malware infections can also damage or remove the Windows boot files, which would give you this message. Sometimes a Windows Update doesn’t install correctly or isn’t finished installing when you restart your computer, and that can prevent Windows from starting too.

Many times, the error results from some type of problem with the hard drive itself. You can read my post about some of those problems here.

The hard drive on the left has a loose cable, the one on the right shows the cable connected snugly.

If you receive any of these messages and want to get your computer working again and recover your data, contact me for an appointment.

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