Facebook App Permissions

Over the years you may have unknowingly given Facebook apps access to your personal information and photos.

Every time you install an app on Facebook, you agree to give the app access to certain parts of your profile. It makes complete sense that Google maps needs to access your location, or Instagram would need to access your photos.

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What we tend to forget are all the other apps we’ve given various permissions to over the years. Every quiz you’ve ever taken, or that old favorite app, “See who looked at your profile”, may have had access to your profile for YEARS.

For example, I opened up my apps on the left and chose the “Cities I’ve Visited” app (which I only used once).  Let’s take a look at what this app has been able to see on my Facebook profile.

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This app can see virtually everything on my profile, and it needs to be removed.  By clicking the privacy at the top right of my Facebook page, I can access the Privacy Checkup.

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Hit “Next” to go to step 2 where you can review your approved apps.

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I’ve scrolled through to find the “Cities I’ve Visited” app. Click the X next to the app to remove it.

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You can repeat the process with as many apps as you’d like, and when you’re done, click next and then finish to exit the Privacy Checkup.

 

 

Leaked Google Photos app appears, showing off automatic image sorting capabilities | PCWorld

We’ve known for some time that Google Photos would be broken away from Google+ into an app of its own, and as someone who uses Google Photos to backup photos from my phone, I’m very happy with the results.

The app will make a clean break from Google+ and give you a ton more editing, sharing, and privacy controls.

Source: Leaked Google Photos app appears, showing off automatic image sorting capabilities | PCWorld

 

FastCustomer

Nobody likes to wait on hold for a long period of time, no matter how good the hold music is. This handy app will call you once a human being is on the phone, saving you all the wait time!

FastCustomer lets you reach a real person at the companies you call most, without waiting on hold.

Source: FastCustomer

 

How to prevent mobile malware in 3 easy steps | PCWorld

Mobile malware tends to loiter in a few “bad neighborhoods” online that you should stay out of anyway.

Source: How to prevent mobile malware in 3 easy steps | PCWorld

 

Flickr Now Gives You 1TB of Free Online Photo Storage

Flickr has revamped their website and smartphone app and is now offering 1TB of free photo storage for every user. That’s 1,000 GB! You could fit 1 million photos into that much space and still have room to spare.

You need to have a Yahoo account to sign up, but they’re free and easy enough to create if you don’t have one.

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You can upload through the web, but I suggest downloading the Flickr Uploadr

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At this point, if you don’t have a Yahoo! ID, you need to create one.

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It took me about 1 minute to create my yahoo account and sign in to the Flickr service.

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Once I logged in, I was greeted with a status screen letting me know how much of my free 1 Terabyte of storage I had remaining. In this case, I haven’t uploaded anything yet so I have the full amount.

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Flickr gives you some default locations where you may or may not have photos so you can just check them off. I keep all my files on a drive on my network, so I won’t be using any of these defaults, but most people will check off the Pictures folder and possibly some or all of the others.

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If you keep photos somewhere else or want to include other locations in addition to the defaults, click the + sign at the bottom left and navigate to the folder you’d like to add.

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At this point, the Flickr Uploadr app will scan the folders and subfolders to make a list of all your files prior to uploading. In my case, it was over 250,000 photos so it took several hours before the uploading actually started.

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Now I can sit back and wait while my photos and videos are backed up online for free.

If you are a Google user, you can check out my post on how to automatically use Gmail to backup your photos taken from a smartphone.

 

US considering using Internet, smartphones for 2020 census

Newsobserver.com is reporting the US Census may use smartphones and the internet in 2020

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— The days of the census taker with clipboard in hand may be numbered. The Census Bureau plans to test digital tools in preparation for the 2020 census, a change that could save millions of dollars.

People may be asked to fill out their census forms on the Internet instead of sending them through the mail. Census takers may use smartphones instead of paper to complete their counts.

You can read the rest of the article here.
 

Infinit- File Sharing App

Infinit – This very useful little app lets you “send any file in less than 4 seconds”.

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Simply create links to your files that can be shared anywhere on the web-  Facebook, Twitter, via email, SMS messages or online forums.

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You’ll have a dedicated inft.ly webpage for your files and you can grant access to anyone you choose. Infinit uses P2P Bitorrent technology so your files are not stored on a server where they can be accessed by any unauthorized users (like the recent celebrity icloud hack).

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Here is a more complete list of features-

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It’s fast, free, and unlimited, so check it out.

 

 

 

How safe is your online data?

You may have heard about the latest celebrity phone hacking scandal involving stars such as Jennifer Lawrence, Ariana Grande and Kate Upton. The photos were stolen from Apple’s iCloud service, and not the phones themselves. Many of the celebs had already deleted the photos and videos from their iPhones, some of them a year or more ago, but they still had those files backed up on iCloud. Hackers use a variety of methods to get into iCloud accounts, from brute force attacks to trying easy to guess passwords, since iCloud would not lock you out if you guessed wrong a certain number of times.

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In the case of these particular celebrity photos, they have been floating around on the “dark net” for quite some time before they were finally leaked publicly.

Though it hasn’t yet been confirmed that the pictures came from iCloud accounts, reports have speculated that the hackers used a recent tool called iBrute, which can repeatedly try different combinations of passwords on Apple’s Find My iPhone service until one of them works. Once Find My iPhone is breached, it is possible to access iCloud passwords and view images and other data stored in a user’s iCloud account. Apple had previously allowed an unlimited number of password attempts on the Find My iPhone service, but it has since limited it to five attempts, making the iBrute tool ineffective. [TheVerge]

You may or may not have intimate photos and videos you want to protect from prying eyes. Even if you don’t, think about all the sensitive information you may have in your email and private messages on Facebook and other social media sites. There’s probably some stuff in there you’d rather keep to yourself.

So what can you do to protect your private files and conversations online?

First, accept that virtually everything we do now electronically can be hacked or compromised. It may only be  a curious spouse, but it could be an ex, a co-worker, or a professional hacker.  The best way to keep someone from gaining access to sensitive data  is not to put it online in the first place.

For data that you DO share, the first thing you should do is have a complex password that nobody can guess. “Password”, “123456” or your telephone number are not going to cut it. As this Password Strength cartoon by Randall Munroe demonstrates, substituting numbers and symbols for letters is still easy for a sophisticated software prgram to crack. 

Password Strength cartoon by Randall Munroe

For example, Bruins?Win?Habs?Lose! will not be easily cracked by hacking software and is easier to remember than Bru1n5W#nH4B5L0s3. Phrases make a password more complaex without being too hard to remember. And if remembering is an issue, try a free password manager like LastPass.

Another thing you can do is enable two step verification. This means in addition to knowing the password, the person trying to get into the account has to have access to some kind of device like your phone. where a code may be sent to verify your identity.

ZDnet has this great info on how to set up two step verification for some of the most popular services:

Apple iCloud

  1. Login to My Apple ID.
  2. Pick “Manage your Apple ID and sign in”
  3. Select “Password and Security”
  4. Under “Two-Step Verification,” select “Get Started,” and follow the instructions.

Note: Be aware that when you change your Apple ID to two-factor authentication, it’s a one-way journey. You can only change your password afterwards by using the two-factor method.

Dropbox

  1. Sign in to Dropbox.
  2. Click on your name from the upper-right of any page to open your account menu.
  3. Click “Settings” from the account menu and select the “Security” tab.
  4. Under “Two-step verification” section, click “Enable.”
  5. Click “Get started” and follow the instructions.

Note: You will need to re-enter your password to enable two-factor verification. Once you do, you’ll be given the choice to receive your security code by text or to use a mobile app.

Google Drive

  1. Login to Google from this link.
  2. Enter your phone number.
  3. Enter the code that you’ll get from either a text or a voice phone call.
  4. Follow the instructions.

Note: You will need to get a new code for each PC or device that uses any Google services. For some services, such as Gmail when accessed on an Apple device or by a mail client or some instant message clients, you’ll also need to set an application specific password.

Microsoft OneDrive

  1. Login to your Microsoft Account.
  2. Go to “Security & Password.”
  3. Under “Password and security info,” tap or click “Edit security info.”
  4. Under “Two-step verification,” tap or click “Set up two-step verification.”
  5. Click “Next,” and then follow the instructions.

Note: Microsoft may require you to enter a security code that the company will send to your phone or email before you can turn on two-step verification.

Many other services now offer two-step authentication. Here are ZDNet articles detailing how to set it up onFacebookTwitter, and Google.

 

thingCHARGER

Let’s face it, all of us are using more and more technology on a daily basis. And I’m a sucker for really useful gadgets. So any new gadget that makes using all that technology easier is right up my alley.

Think about all the chargers you have for your mobile devices. My wife and I each have a smartphone – I have a Galaxy S4 from Samsung and she has an iPhone 5, so we can’t share a charger. Our iPad uses the older iPhone 4 charger so we have a few of those around. And we kept our old smartphones and use them off the data plan for the kids to play educational games on. That’s even more chargers. We keep multiple chargers in various places around the house so we don’t have to keep unplugging them and moving them.

This gadget makes all of that clutter and all those chargers go away. thingCharger is a simple enough concept. It plugs in to any existing outlet,  and adds a charging port on the top of the outlet. In the back of the thingCharger are tips for the common mobile device types (Apple Lightning tips for the i{hone 5 are $9 extra).

The charging tips and the back of the thingCharger where they are stored.
The charging tips and the back of the thingCharger where they are stored.

This let’s you mount your phone or tablet ontop of the outlet without any adapter or cable. It adds 2 USB ports on the bottom and you can still access the 2 power outlets. As if that wasn’t enough, they are stackable! You can plug several in ontop of one another and have multiple devices charging from one outlet.

Several thingCharger's stacked together with devices charging ontop.
Several thingCharger’s stacked together with devices charging ontop.

The project is still in the manufacturing phase but you can buy them now. And if you buy several you can get some for free. Buy 3, get 2 free, buy 4 get 3 free, buy 5 and get 5 free.

You can watch the full video and read more about thingCharger on their website.